Gelli Arts® and Grafix® : Abstract Art by Kirsten Varga

Hello fellow creatives! Today’s post features products by
Gelli Arts®and Grafix® 

The polyester films by Grafix®are fun to work with and challenged me creatively because of their translucent
and transparent properties. I started out with the mindset to just experiment
with these new-to-me products and at the end I had plenty options to mix and
match as I created my art. The resulting artwork is vibrant, textural and has a
depth of color that makes my eyes happy.

I used the clear Craft Plastic to cut out multiple arch shapes to use as masks during the printing process. In the end they were beautifully layered and I had to include them in my final composition. The opaque white Craft Plastic has a velvety matte surface that accepted the acrylic paint beautifully! The two Dura-lar films printed beautifully as well and their less porous surfaces helped the acrylic paint print a subtle texture. I was also able to get a few more “ghost prints” then when I use regular paper.

Please watch the following process video to see how the magic happened.

Happy Creating!

Materials:

  • 9×12″ Gelli Arts® printing plate
  • Mini Texture combs by Gelli Arts®
  • Brayer
  • DecoArt Americana Premium Acrylic Paint (Pyrrole
    Red, Cadmium Orange Hue, Primary Yellow, Primary Cyan and Translucent White)
  • Dixie® All Purpose Food Wrap
  • For the finished artwork: Old Dictionary pages, 12×12 substrates and gel medium

Grafix®Products:

  • Dura-lar®: .004 Wet Media Film (9×12) and .005
    Two-sided Matte Film (9×12)
  • Craft
    Plastic: .020 Crystal Clear (12×12) and .010
    Opaque White (12×12)



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1 thought on “Gelli Arts® and Grafix® : Abstract Art by Kirsten Varga”

  1. Excellent presentation of a new way to use other materials to mask. The final results quite wonderful.

    How were the layers ‘glued’ together at the end so the abstract collage could be mounted?

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